Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center
Fishersville, VA 22939

Vocational Training Services

Curriculum Projects

Auto Mechanics Training Area

The Auto Service Technician Training Program offers the following services, delivered through curriculum projects as part of the student learning experience. Charges apply for parts and supplies only; there are no labor costs.

  • Oil Changes (parts plus oil disposal fee)
    The cost of materials used varies with each vehicle, as each vehicle requires a different type and amount of oil. The cost of the oil filter varies depending on the grade of the oil filter. The range of an oil change would be between $20.00 and $30.00.
  • Mount/Balance Tires
    The customer is expected to supply the tires. There is no fee for this service.

By appointment only. Call 540-332-7145

Culinary Skills/Food Service Training Area

The Culinary Skills/Food Service Training Area offers on-site dining services through a student-operated cafeteria known as Woody’s Café, typically open Monday-Thursday on a weekly basis. For a nominal fee, WWRC staff and guests may purchase a lunch ticket and enjoy a meal prepared and served by WWRC Culinary Skills/Food Service training students. This type of hands-on, experiential learning with close supervision and instructor engagement has a demonstrated track record in preparing students for community-based internship experiences and ultimately, for employment.

The Culinary Skills/Food Service Training Area also offers catering services – for a listing of items offered and the associated price list, click HERE.

Production and Assembly Worker

The Production and Assembly Worker Training Program creates several small items as curriculum projects to allow students the opportunity to learn steps, processes, and associated tools in a production environment and to practice acquired knowledge and skills, as part of the student learning experience. Examples of items produced as curriculum projects include cutting boards, step stools, and bird houses.

Costs associated with these curriculum projects cover materials and supplies only; there are no labor charges. Funds obtained through the selling of products allow the restocking of materials and supplies for additional curriculum projects.

The Production and Assembly Worker Training Program typically sells its curriculum-produced items through community activities like the local Art in the Park. These items are also available to other customers upon request, as products are available.

Computer Support Specialist

The Computer Support Specialist Training Program operates an on-campus Computer Repair Shop as a curriculum project in lieu of a community-based internship experience. Students are required to demonstrate effective communication skills in talking with customers who may include WWRC staff, other students, and local community residents. For example, when customers drop off a laptop or computer for repair, students must be able to ask questions to understand the issues. As another example, students must be able to converse over the telephone to let the customer know when the computer or laptop is ready for pick-up. Through the Computer Repair Shop, students obtain hands-on experience and practical application of knowledge and skills gained and are able to be evaluated against industry-based customer service, communication, and proficiency expectations. The cost of this service is for parts only, no labor charges apply.

Students in the Computer Support Specialist Training Program may also submit other curriculum project ideas to their Instructor for consideration to demonstrate skills acquired. Technology-related special interest projects that engage teams of students are encouraged. Examples of recent special interest curriculum projects that have been conducted include:

  • Classroom NAS Server built from spare parts;
  • Creation of multi-boot machines that run several versions of Windows, Mac OS, and Linux;
  • Creation of VOIP Phone and Alarm systems;
  • Building of supercomputers built from several Rasberry Pi Micro Computers;
  • High Definition TVs built from broken laptops and controllers;
  • Networking projects conducted with spare computers and parts; and,
  • Computers and small robotic projects built using small parts and the classroom 3D printer.